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Cleaner Glass for gas fireplaces

  • By interactive
  • 11 Oct, 2015

Why does the glass get dirty on my gas fireplace, and how often should I be cleaning it?  The answer: it depends, because there are many factors that affect cleanliness of the window on your gas fireplace or stove.

The build up on the window of a gas fireplace is often a white haze, a black soot, or maybe both.  In any event, regular cleaning with a good fireplace glass cleaner should do the trick at getting the window to sparkle like new.

The white build up, often described as a “cloudy” look to the glass, results for a few reasons.  When a fireplace is started up from a cold state, condensation may be noticed on the inside of the glass.  As the water evaporates and the fireplace glass gets hot, water spots (or mineral deposits) may develop, and leave the window looking like a dirty piece of glassware from the dishwasher.  This build up can me stubborn to remove, and may require you to polish it off with an appropriate glass cleaner that contains mild abrasives.  CAUTION: using the wrong kind of cleaner or abrasives will scratch the glass leaving you with swirl marks.  The only remedy if this happens is to replace the glass.

If the build up on the glass is black, then you have soot build up.  Soot is the product of cold or incomplete combustion.  Gas fireplaces are engineered to burn cleanly, and if you are experiencing incomplete combustions, then your fireplace needs to be inspected and/or tuned up.  Gas pressure, burner settings, and log positioning play a role in clean and complete combustion.  You may check these factors yourself, but most people contact a hearth professional for this service.  In addition to tuning the fireplace, a thorough cleaning and detailing is often part of the service call.

Soot build up should be monitored closely, and if significant, fireplace use should be discontinued until a remedy is found.  In addition to the build up on the glass, you may be getting buildup on the logs, the interior of the firebox, and the outside venting on the house.  Cleaning all of these affected areas can elevate a minor cleaning to a major cleaning, costing you more money.

Some other thoughts:

  • When you turn the fireplace on, run it until the condensation is evaporated, your glass will stay looking cleaner
  • Do not use any glass cleaner containing ammonia.  It is possible to etch the glass permanently if there is an ammonia film on the glass when the fireplace is used.
  • Household window cleaner can be used to remove the soot build up, followed by a fireplace glass cleaner (polish), to really get the glass to sparkle.
  • Clean you glass 1-3 times per year based on use.  The more often you clean the glass, the less elbow grease required!
  • Always contact a hearth professional if you have any questions or concerns about build up.  It could be a sign that something is wrong with your fireplace.
By interactive 06 Jul, 2016
By interactive 01 Jun, 2016

Do NOT touch the glass or any metal part of your fireplace. These are heat producing appliances and you can be burned by them.

By interactive 01 Jun, 2016

The Maximum allowable surface temperature is 117° F OVER ambient (room) temperature. Thus, if a room is 70° – 80° the exposed combustible surfaces immediately surrounding the Fireplace can have a surface temperature as high as 187° F. – 197° F. (Too hot to touch) and still be safe.

By interactive 01 Jun, 2016

Yes, Call for a service technician to come out and take a look

NO – Then you need to break-in your fireplace

 During the initial burn and curing cycle of any fireplace, it is normal for the appliance and any accessory item installed on the Product to emit some amounts of smoke and odors.

The sources of the emitted smoke and odor are normal emission of paint curing chemical reaction at high temperatures, evaporation of manufacturing related oils or lubrication, small amounts of dextrin emitted from heated gaskets and insulation materials and small amounts (less than 0.5 grams) of polyester burning emissions from glass gasket adhesive film.

Smoke emission is to be expected for the first 2-1/2 hours of initial burn on high fire with fans turned off. Remove or disconnect any smoke alarms which may alarm during this period of initial burn. Prior to initial firing, it is required that the glass gasket to firebox face seal be thoroughly inspected to make certain glass gasket is seated properly and sealing properly. (This is done by our technicians during the finish on the fireplace )

It is recommended that during the first 2-1/2 hours of initial burn, that all windows in the room be opened to evacuate emitted smoke and odors. If anyone in the home has allergies or any is sensitive to smells or smoke that they not be in the home during the initial burn of the fireplace.

Following the initial burn, some slight odors may be present but will diminish with further use and will completely dissipate.

Any odors that are emitted from the appliance are of non-toxic origin.

By interactive 01 Jun, 2016
If you are not the original owner we recommend doing the “break-in” on your fireplace. Sometimes it can take multiple days or burns for the smell to completely go away. We recommend running the fireplace for 6 – 8 hours on high for 3 consecutive days. If you still have the smell, call to have a service technician come out and take a look.
By interactive 01 Jun, 2016
This information can be found in your owner’s manual. If you can’t find it give us a call and we would be happy to try and help you over the phone.
By interactive 01 Jun, 2016
IPI (Intermittent Pilot Ignition) – This is also sometimes referred to as “Electronic Ignition” Your pilot light is not on all the time. When you turn your fireplace on you may here a faint “tick, tick, tick” noise and then the pilot will light and then a few seconds later your fireplace burner will turn on.
CPI (Continuous Pilot Ignition) - Your pilot light (blue flame down by your logs or alternate media) will be on all of the time
If you live in a colder state like Minnesota the manufacturer recommended that even if you have and IPI (Intermittent Pilot Ignition) system that when the temperatures fall below 32 degrees that you switch your fireplace into the CPI (Continuous Pilot Ignition) for the colder months. Your fireplace will have easier time lighting.
By interactive 01 Jun, 2016
We do not service fireplaces that come from the Big Box Stores as our technicians are not familiar with these fireplaces and parts are not readily available from our distributors.
By interactive 01 Jun, 2016
Yes! We have full time service technicians that go through regular training so they are up-to-date on the most current information for all of the brands we carry.
By interactive 01 Jun, 2016
Typically not, but sometimes during the off-season (spring and summer) we may be able to accommodate this request.

Installing a product that was purchase elsewhere is often a challenge because we cannot guarantee the accuracy of the components, know if parts are missing and often the warranty must be filed with the original retail store as they have the relationship with the manufacturer. In addition, repeat visits are often required incurring additional costs for the home owner.

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